Volume 1, Issue 1, December 2017, Page: 9-11
Surgical Clip Migration Following Laproscopic Cholecystectomy as a Cause of CBD Stone
Waseem Raja, Department of Gastroenterology, Medical Trust Hospital, Kochi, India
Sunil K. Mathai, Department of Gastroenterology, Medical Trust Hospital, Kochi, India
Benoy Sebastian, Department of Gastroenterology, Medical Trust Hospital, Kochi, India
Ashfaq Ahmad, Department of Gastroenterology, Medical Trust Hospital, Kochi, India
Shiraz Salim Khan, Department of Gastroenterology, Medical Trust Hospital, Kochi, India
Mary George, Department of Gastroenterology, Medical Trust Hospital, Kochi, India
Received: Jan. 3, 2017;       Accepted: May 17, 2017;       Published: Jul. 10, 2017
DOI: 10.11648/j.ijg.20170101.16      View  1359      Downloads  68
Abstract
Foreign bodies in the common bile duct (CBD) are either iatrogenic or accidental. Increasing number of biliary interventional procedures both surgical and endoscopic are responsible for iatrogenic foreign bodies in the CBD. Here we report an unusual case of 59 year old female who presented with upper abdominal pain, jaundice and altered LFT with significant past history of laproscopic cholecystectomy. Endoscopic ultrasound revealed a linear hyper-echoic lesion with acoustic shadowing in the distal CBD, suggestive of a stone with central hyperechoic nidus, which was later confirmed by ERCP and removed by Dormia basket. The stone was crushed and two surgical clips were isolated fron the stone.
Keywords
Laproscopic Cholecystectomy, Surgical Clips, Complication, Clip Migrations, ERCP
To cite this article
Waseem Raja, Sunil K. Mathai, Benoy Sebastian, Ashfaq Ahmad, Shiraz Salim Khan, Mary George, Surgical Clip Migration Following Laproscopic Cholecystectomy as a Cause of CBD Stone, International Journal of Gastroenterology. Vol. 1, No. 1, 2017, pp. 9-11. doi: 10.11648/j.ijg.20170101.16
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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