Archive
2019, Volume 3
2018, Volume 2
2017, Volume 1




Volume 3, Issue 1, June 2019, Page: 1-3
Hookworm Infection as a Rare Cause of Acute Pancreatitis
Mónica Andreia Pereira Da Silva Laureano, Department of General Surgery II, Centro Hospitalar de Leiria, Leiria, Portugal
João Miguel Salvador Nobre, Department of General Surgery II, Centro Hospitalar de Leiria, Leiria, Portugal
Inês Coelho Gonçalves, Department of General Surgery II, Centro Hospitalar de Leiria, Leiria, Portugal
Nuno Henrique Ventura Ferreira, Department of General Surgery II, Centro Hospitalar de Leiria, Leiria, Portugal
Tânia Raquel Telmo Valente, Department of General Surgery II, Centro Hospitalar de Leiria, Leiria, Portugal
Sandra Maria Martins Amado, Department of General Surgery II, Centro Hospitalar de Leiria, Leiria, Portugal
Maria Fernanda Cunha E Silva, Department of Anatomical Pathology, Centro Hospitalar de Leiria, Leiria, Portugal
Sandra Maria Maurício Hilário Pires, Department of General Surgery II, Centro Hospitalar de Leiria, Leiria, Portugal
Miguel Nuno Lages Coelho Dos Santos, Department of General Surgery II, Centro Hospitalar de Leiria, Leiria, Portugal
Received: Dec. 18, 2018;       Accepted: Jan. 21, 2019;       Published: Feb. 15, 2019
DOI: 10.11648/j.ijg.20190301.11      View  331      Downloads  58
Abstract
The aim of this case report is to alert physicians to the possibility that hookworm disease can lead to acute pancreatitis. Method: We report a case of hookworm infestation associated with acute pancreatitis and food intolerance. Result: The patient presented on the emergency department complaining of anorexia, asthenia, nausea, vomiting, epigastric pain and fever. Blood test showed a amylase of 512U/L and a lipase of 1902, normal levels of hepatic aminotransferases, bilirubin and alkaline phosphatase and a slight elevation of the Creactive protein. An ultrasound showed no cholelithiasis, thickening of vesicular wall or dilation of the common bile duct and the computed tomography (CT) showed a normal pancreas with no evidence of cholecystitis or peripancreatic fluid. An upper digestive endoscopy was done because of food intolerance and revealed gastric stasis and duodenal mucosa congestive, friable, with loss of the usual pleating with biopsies revealing the presence of Ancylostoma duodenale. The patient was treated with albendazole and remains asymptomatic in a 3-year follow-up. Conclusion: Hookworm infestation is usually asymptomatic. Ampulla of Vater-migrating hookworms resulting in acute pancreatitis is a very rare event.
Keywords
Hookworm Infestation, Ancylostoma Duodenale, Acute Pancreatitis, Food Intolerance
To cite this article
Mónica Andreia Pereira Da Silva Laureano, João Miguel Salvador Nobre, Inês Coelho Gonçalves, Nuno Henrique Ventura Ferreira, Tânia Raquel Telmo Valente, Sandra Maria Martins Amado, Maria Fernanda Cunha E Silva, Sandra Maria Maurício Hilário Pires, Miguel Nuno Lages Coelho Dos Santos, Hookworm Infection as a Rare Cause of Acute Pancreatitis, International Journal of Gastroenterology. Vol. 3, No. 1, 2019, pp. 1-3. doi: 10.11648/j.ijg.20190301.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Reference
[1]
Bartsch SM, Hotez PJ, Asti L, et al. The Global Economic and Health Burden of Human Hookworm Infection. PLoS Negl Trop Dis 2016; 10: e0004922.
[2]
Jourdan PM, Lamberton PHL, Fenwick A, Addiss DG. Soil-transmitted helminth infections. Lancet 2017.
[3]
http: //universoparasito. blogspot. pt/2014/07/ancilostomiase. html
[4]
Marco Albonico, Lorenzo Savioli. Hookwor: a negleted ressurgente infection. BMJ 2017; 359: j 4813.
[5]
Tseng LM, Sun CK, Wang TL, Lin AC. Hookworm infection as unexpected cause of recurrent pancreatitis. Am J Emerg. Med. 2014 Nov; 32 (11): 1435. e3-4.
[6]
Hotez PJ, Bethany J, Bottazzi ME, Brooker S, Buss P. Hoohworm: “The great infection of mankind”. PLoS Med. 2005 Mar 2 (3): e67.
[7]
David R Haburchak, Christopher M Watson, Vinod K Dhawan, Pranatharthi Haran Chandrasekar, Jeffrey L Arnold, Basim Asmar, Anika Baxter Tam, Pranatharthi Haran Chandrasekar, Swati Garekar, Aaron Hexdall, Patrick W Hickey, Ashir Kumar, Mark Louden, Russell W Steele, Francisco Talavera, Eric L Weiss, Mary L Windle. Hookworm disease. Medscape.
[8]
Drugs for Parasitic Infections, 3rd ed, The Medical Letter, New Rochelle, NY 2013.
[9]
Moser W, Schindler C, Keiser J. Efficacy of recommended drugs against soil transmitted helminths: systematic review and network meta-analysis. BMJ 2017; 358: j4307.
[10]
Loukas A, Hotez PJ, Diemert D, Yazdanbakhsh M, McCarthy JS, Correa-Oliveira R, Croese J, Bethony JM. Hookworm infection. Nat Rev Dis Primers 2016; 2: 16088. doi: 10.1038/nrdp.2016.88.
[11]
de Silva NR, BrookerS, Hotez PJ, Montresor A, Engels D, Savioli L. Soil-transmitted helminth infections: updatins the global picture. Trends Parasitol. 2003 Dec. 19 (12): 547-51.
[12]
Stoltzfus RJ, Dreyfuss ML, Chwaya HM, Albonico M. Hookworm control as a strategy to prevent iron deficiency. Nutr. Rev 1997 Jun. 55 (6): 223-32.
Browse journals by subject